Rural Development

Rural populations are facing significant challenges from climate change due to a combination of factors including a lack of resources, information, and institutional capacity to adapt. By combining climate change adaptation with traditional development, the vulnerability of these populations can be reduced, and their adaptive capacity improved. Projects focused on rural development typically focus on a combination of factors, such as reversing land degradation and enhancing ecosystem services, to improve a rural population’s ability to cope with climate change as well as their ability to generate income.

Increasing Climate Resilience of Rural Communities in Tajikistan

Tajikistan - Asia-Pacific

Improve livelihood resilience through community-based climate change adaptation in the transboundary watershed of Goascorán in El Salvador and Honduras

Regional - LAC

National Natural Capital Programme to harness resilient ecological infrastructure for systemic climate adaptation of communities with blended finance and women/youth entrepreneurs

Mozambique - Africa

Strengthening land based adaptation capacity in communities adjacent to protected areas in Armenia (Armenia 1)

Armenia - Eastern Europe

Increasing adaptive capacity of local communities, ecosystems and hydroelectric systems in the Toachi-Pilatón watershed with a focus on Ecosystem and Community Based Adaptation and Integrated Adaptive Watershed Management

Ecuador - Latin America and Caribbean

The proposed project general aims at strengthening the adaptive capacity of vulnerable populations, ecosystems and hydroelectric systems in the Río Blanco upper watershed and develop a model of adaptation to climate change that can be replicated in similar context in the country and in the region. The specific objectives of the project are: Reduce the impact

AYNINACUY: Strategies for adaptation to climate change, for the preservation of livestock capital and livelihoods in highland rural communities

Peru - LAC

In Peru raising Andean camelids is the main livelihood among the highland communities, whose population engaged in this activity, is estimated to be approximately 1.5 million. Camelid producing areas in Peru include the provinces with the highest levels of poverty and marginalization. Due to the impacts of climate change, the activity of raising camelids by vulnerable

Climate Smart Integrated Rural Development Project

Ethiopia - Sub-Saharan Africa

Agricultural production in Ethiopia is dominated by small-scale subsistence farmers (about 8 million households) who practice traditional farming methods, accounting for 95% of the total area under production. The high proportion of rain-fed crop production makes the sector very sensitive to rainfall variability. Productivity has historically been constrained by rainfall variability and extremes, low soil

Increasing adaptive capacity of local communities, ecosystems and hydroelectric systems in the Toachi – Pilatón watershed

Ecuador

Increasing adaptive capacity of local communities, ecosystems and hydroelectric systems in the Toachi – Pilatón watershed with a focus on Ecosystem and Community Based Adaptation and Integrated Adaptive Watershed Management

(Approved project) AYNINACUY: Strategies for Adaptation to Climate Change, for the Preservation of Livestock Capital and Livelihoods in Highland Rural Communities…

Peru

This project concept has been later approved as a fully-developed project proposal. Learn more > AYNINACUY: Strategies for adaptation to climate change, for the preservation of livestock capital and livelihoods in highland rural communities in the provinces of Arequipa, Caylloma, Condesuyos, Castilla and La Union in the Arequipa Region.

Addressing Climate Change Risks on Water Resources and Food Security in the Dry Zone of Myanmar

Myanmar - Asia-Pacific

This project, “Addressing Climate Change Risks in Water Resources and Food Security in the Dry Zone of Myanmar”, seeks to minimize the increasing impacts of climate change on agricultural and livestock production cycles in the Myanmar Dry Zone. From increasing temperature and water evaporation, to declining water availability, more frequent droughts, and intensifying weather